Calvinism Archives - Seedbed

I think the deepest appeal of Wesleyan theology is that is heartily affirms a God who is truly good and sincerely loves all persons. God does not determine, God empowers, enables, encourages. And the message that God loves us and wants to empower us to love him back, as well as each other is a message of great hope. No one has been “passed over” or determined by God for eternal misery and damnation. To the contrary, there is hope for everyone, and the resources of grace are available to transform even those persons who may seem most hopeless in our eyes.

I’m a Wesleyan. Always have been, always will be. However, as I look across the landscape of American evangelicalism, it’s hard to escape the...

Beginning in the early days of the Methodist Revival, John Wesley’s position on predestination became a controversial issue.  His friend and partner in ministry...

The rapid increase of those who identify as "young, restless, and Reformed" is bringing fresh attention to the doctrine of election, which is one...

No matter how much we believe the other’s position is wrong or just plain bad theology, it is not OK to attack one another. Nothing stands to undermine our mission more than this kind of bearing toward one another. So let us debate and write books and dig deeper into the truth as we understand it, but let us do so with the holy love of God for one another.

Austin Fischer narrates this journey—into and out of Calvinism—in his newly published book Young, Restless, No Longer Reformed. Fischer’s journey will engage readers of all theological persuasions, but it is his theological arguments for leaving Calvinism woven throughout his narration that will force readers to set the book down after each chapter and ponder the questions, “Who is God?” and “How do I know?”

We are pleased to team up with Roger E. Olson to offer you this free ebook: Arminianism FAQ: Everything You Always Wanted to Know. Roger is a leading voice on the issues surrounding the biblical understanding of salvation and has spent the last few years of his life bringing clarity to this discussion.
Seedbed - Seven Minute Seminaryvideo

Some point to Romans 7 as the proof-text for the saint-sinner paradox, suggesting that if even the apostle Paul struggled with his unrelenting flesh, Christians must face defeat in certain areas of their Christian life. On the contrary, Ben Witherington suggests that ancient rhetoric illuminates the passage in a way that eliminates Paul as the subject of this passage and paints a more optimistic picture of God's sanctifying grace.
Seedbed - Seven Minute Seminary

Does Romans 9-11 teach Calvinist predestination? In this Seven Minute Seminary, Ben Witherington explains that Paul's aim is to refute the idea that God now favored the Romans, or Gentiles, rather than the Jews. In the process, he explains how the terms predestination, election, and salvation relate—or don't relate—to one another.

When Wesleyan ideas are put to the test, the theory makes for good logic and even better practice than Calvinism. Read Brian LePort's review of Calvin vs. Wesley, a recent book which generously compares these two compelling, and in some ways, competing traditions.

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