Uncategorized Archives - Seedbed

Celtic saints became saints because the community in which they lived recognized their life of holiness and relationship to God. Perhaps one reason there are so many Celtic saints is because they saw no separation between what was secular and religious - all of life was sacred, and therefore consecrated to God. It was intertwined, much like the famous knotwork still popular today.

The “I” pronoun has disappeared in favor of “us” and “we.” Instead of asserting his rights – rights he was born into and rights he earned – the disappearing “I” pronoun shows he is instead relinquishing them. A psalm that could be about his personal religion instead becomes a song about our collective faith.

The rules are not the relationship under this new covenant. But deeper, much deeper, is the revelation that all people matter to God.

The first name given in creation was Adam. It means humanity. The Scripture story tells us that God, through Jesus Christ, created all of humanity in his image and breathed into us the breath of life. I thought of Adam when I saw the first hashtag given to Aylan’s story: Humanity Washed Ashore.

Fall is a season of celebrating God’s bounty, and gratefulness should overflow and splash out onto everyone you come in contact with. Yet, there is an urgency to autumn. You are driven to harvest what you have planted. To reap what you have sown. To store up the results of spring’s work and summer’s care. To feast on a harvest of righteousness, if that’s indeed what you’ve planted and nurtured. Though a physical fattening up for the winter is no longer something we North Americans have a need for, it is imperative that you fatten your soul on spiritual disciplines throughout the spring and summer, but especially in the fall, if you expect to survive the soul’s winter.

The cry to “make the Bible relevant to today’s world” not only implies that the Bible itself lacks relevance, a point discussed yesterday, it...

The utilitarian vision sees the body of a man or woman as an object which can be assessed like a car. Is it bright, new, shiny and full of power, or not? Is your body thin or fat; does it conform to the shapes we admire or not; is your hair the right texture and color or not; are your teeth shiny and straight or not? In the covenantal vision, the mystery and glory is that we have bodies, and those bodies are beautiful to God because they are living sacraments in the world, an outward sign of an inward and spiritual grace, since all of the means of grace come through the physicality of the body.

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. Charlotte Easley shares resources that emphasize the importance of having tough conversations and tips on how you can help.

We must be honest about our failures and sins. None of us lives up to the standards our faith demands. But this doesn’t mean we cease wrestling with and proclaiming the Word.

How can denominational leaders support the risk-taking entrepreneurs of the church? Anita Eastlack shares some practical steps for being supportive of church planters.

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