Worship Design Collective Archives - Page 20 of 21 - Seedbed
Worship Design Collective

Worship Design Collective

Many forget (or don’t know) that “contemporary” worship was inextricably linked to the Charismatic Movement of the 1960’s and 70’s. This connection forged a musical style that was rooted in a particular understanding of the Spirit in worship. God was uniquely encountered, by the Spirit, in congregational singing.

Many still use the term “contemporary worship” as it was used in 1995. What should be clear is that several things have changed over the past two-decades. Here are six things that are different from contemporary worship in the '90s.

Contemporary worship music has come under fire for being flashy and theologically weak. However, always the contrarian, I have become a bit perturbed by the way that many people talk about contemporary worship. This dismissive attitude becomes ultimately unhelpful because it assigns generalities to an entire genre of music.

I've often thought of my life as having been lived on the edge of the liturgy. I suspect that perspective will resonate with many in the Wesleyan and Methodist tradition. I offer here a few reflections on the early stages of my own journey from the edge of the liturgical stream into deeper waters.

Worship pastor Drew Causey shares 5 of his favorite modern hymn artists and arrangements, arguing that the depth of writing in the hymnody of the Church is something people love (and desire), and when style of music can become a means to this end, the Church only benefits.

One of the criticisms of “contemporary worship” following 9/11 was that the style of worship provided no space for real lament. I would suggest that this is not a problem merely limited to “contemporary-styled” services.

It is a weekly reality for me. A pastor or church leader will call me asking me who I know that could be a...

Yes, there is certainly great excitement in our culture as Christmas approaches. It’s the season to be jolly and joyous. To be anything contrary runs the risk of coming across as a mean ol’ Scrooge.

This past Christmas our family made the pilgrimage to Disney World. It’s fascinating how Disney didn’t set out to build a theme park but to create a world.

Featured Books

2489
0

2489
0

2463
0

2463
0