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Worship Design Collective

Worship Design Collective

For many people, not only is there a paradoxical tension of anonymity and unity at the communion table, but at times, communion has been reduced to mere ritual and formality- something we should do, but without any real sense of why.

Worship and Christian education are often kept separate within the church. As some argue, both serve different functions, one for instruction and the other for worship. In reality, however, they are not that different. The worship leader is a kind of catechist whose purpose is to both usher people into the presence of God and instruct them in His truth.

In this video, watch Matt Sigler summarize 3 key insights that the Wesleyan movement offers to contemporary worship. They include rootedness, personal, and sanctifying elements, all of which may serve to renew the contemporary worship movement.

In a world that is increasingly loud and hard, ministers can lead worship experiences of quiet where we find a soft place to land in the love of God through Christ Jesus. Read more today from Laura Beach on the importance of guided times of lament and grief in worship.

Why don't they sing? There are many situations where those present in a church program sing with great gusto and spiritual fervor, but this isn't always the case. In today's article, Mary Crowson shares 5 reasons why a church might not be singing along—and suggests for curbing this from happening.

Market segmentation—it's a business concept that appears to have made its way into the church, expressed primarily through worship services tailored for different audiences. In today's post, Jonathan Lawson examines the effect of traditional and contemporary worship styles on the church.

In this video interview, international song-writer and worship leader Andy Piercy shares two pieces of advice, both spiritual and practical, for worship leaders. He also reminds leaders the 4 things that matter most for congregations wanting to sing along.

In this proposal for a new "job description" for worship leaders, Nathan Smith argues that the goal of corporate worship should be to remind the people of God of the story of God’s redemption through Christ, which should make the Christian Worship Leader the best storytellers.

One of the criticisms of “contemporary worship” following 9/11 was that the style of worship provided no space for real lament. I would suggest that this is not a problem merely limited to “contemporary-styled” services.

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